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How Should You Travel New Zealand? Bus, Buy, or Rent a Campervan?

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How Should You Travel New Zealand? Bus, Buy, or Rent a Campervan?

Our first day in New Zealand was frantic as we tried to decide how we were going to travel around. We had done zero research before we arrived.

We couldn't decide-- Should we get bus tickets? Or, should we rent or buy a campervan?

We realized we're not the only ones. This is every traveler's question:

How to Travel New Zealand? Should you Bus, Rent or Buy a Campervan?

Photo by Leio McLaren

Photo by Leio McLaren

We ended up buying a campervan and traveling for five months around NZ, but we went through this whole decision making process to get there. 

To help you with your own trip, we created this guide to help you walk through the decision making process. 

Your decision depends on: 

  1. Your age

  2. Your timeline

  3. Your budget

  4. And how much freedom you want while traveling.

Since you have your own unique situation, we’ll guide you through how we made our decision so you can make the best decision for your trip.

 

 

HOW TO DECIDE?

COST PER DAY

We didn't know how to make our decision, but we knew our biggest determining factor was our budget.  

So we thought our decision could be determined by looking at the cost per day for our options. 

We saw ourselves with four options:

  1. Buy a campervan

  2. Rent a campervan

  3. Rent a small car and sleep in our tent

  4. Bus around New Zealand

We snagged a coffee and a napkin at Starbucks on Queen Street, started researching, and scratched our estimated costs down in a table like this one. These are based on two people traveling. 

How Should You Travel New Zealand? Bus, Rent, or Buy a Campervan to Travel New Zealand

Like us, you can see buying a campervan, renting a sedan and tenting, and busing are around the same cost per day at NZ$45 looking at staying for 90 days. Renting a campervan was double! 

So, we decided to focus on those three options for our trip and remove renting a campervan as an option since it was too expensive for us. 

While we were researching, we also realized other factors were affecting our decision. We had to figure out how long we'd be in New Zealand (our timeline), we realized each option had extra costs we'd incur, and we realized age can be a deciding factor for some people too.  

 

AGE

Age may affect your options, so we wanted to cover this for you. 

DRIVING

If you are age 16 or older: You can drive a vehicle in New Zealand.

 

BUYING A CAMPERVAN

If you are age 16 or older: You can also buy and register a vehicle in your name.

 

RENTING A CAMPERVAN

If you are 16 or 17: There are a limited number of rental companies allowing you to hire a vehicle.

If you are age 16 to 24: You may have to pay a young drivers’ surcharge. Look at the details of each rental company’s policies and if they require this extra charge.

If you are age 18 or older: Many of the popular rental companies will allow you to rent from their fleet. However, most companies require you to be 21 or older. When you’re researching rentals, make sure you look at the age requirements for each company.  

If you are 25 or older: You have no worries renting from any companies. You’ll have heaps of options! 

 

BUSING NEW ZEALAND

If you are 16 or older: You can buy a bus ticket to travel the country.

 

Age wasn't a factor for us, it was the cost. But first, we had to decide how long we planned to be traveling in New Zealand.

 

TIMELINE

Your anticipated time in NZ is a big factor in your decision. Some folks only have three months for a road trip around the country on a 90-day tourist visa. For these people, the timing is set.

We had a different situation. We applied for and received one-year working holiday visas. Even though we had the opportunity to stay for one year, we really didn’t know if we wanted to stay that long. However, we wanted to leave the option open for ourselves. So, we planned to travel for at least three months with the chance of using the vehicle for up to a full year.

90 Days or More?

To be safe, we based all of our per day costs on being in the country for three months (90 days).

Looking back at our estimated costs, the bus looked like our best option at about NZ$3,900. However, on top of bus tickets, we knew we would also be paying 90 days worth of hostel fees for a place to sleep each night. That sounded expensive.

How to Travel New Zealand? Should you Bus, Rent or Buy a Campervan?

Looking at our two other options, we saw our Rent: Sedan + Tent option and the Buy: Campervan were the same price at NZ $4,000. With both of these options, we knew there were extra expenses to include like camping fees for each night and petrol costs. 

Again, our deciding factor was our budget. But, at the beginning of our travels, we had no idea how to gauge how much these extra expenses would be for us.

Now that we've bought and traveled NZ for five months, we’ll show you what these extra costs really look like for your trip.

 

EXTRA COSTS

For each of our options, we'd have extra costs.

For busing, we'd have to pay for hostels every night. For buying or renting a campervan, we'd be paying for petrol and campsites every night.  

After having experience road tripping NZ for five months, here's what you can expect on how much you’ll pay for the three main extra costs: campsites, hostels, and petrol.

 

1. CAMPSITE FEES

Campsites are all over New Zealand and easy to find.

There are three types of campsites:

  1. Free: Yes! We love free!

  2. Department of Conservation (DOC) Sites: These are between NZ$6 to NZ$10 per person per night. There are over 200 sites all around the country.

  3. Holiday Parks and Private Campsites: These are “luxury” campsites and can be over NZ$30 for two people per night.

Note: In NZ, expect to pay for camping each night on a per person basis. We are used to paying a flat fee per group in the US per night, so this was a cultural detail we had to get used to.

How to Find Campsites

Use the app CamperMate! You'll find everything you need like campsites, showers, laundry, things to do, toilets, and anything else on there. It'll be your best bud in NZ! 

Our Experience with Campsites

We stayed at free campsites every night we had the option (this was the majority of our nights).

If we weren’t near a free site, we found DOC sites. Again, there are over 200 sites, so there’s a good chance you’ll find one nearby. 

The holiday parks and private campsites are upper-end sites, but have the lovely luxury of plumbing, showers, and laundry. Since we were on a tight budget, we only had a few nights when we were forced to stay at a holiday park. This was due to a lack of free or DOC campsites in popular cities like Queenstown, Auckland, and the Coromandel.

How we Saved Money

Since many free campsites and DOC sites don't have showers, we used the app CamperMate to find public showers and Laundromats instead of staying at nicer campsites and paying more just to use the showers and washer and dryer. 

 

2. HOSTEL FEES

With busing, we knew this would be an extra expense.

Looking around online, we found dorm beds in backpackers’ hostels costing about NZ$25 per person per night. A double room costs about NZ$60 per night (NZ$30 per person).

When we saw how much hostels would be per night, busing quickly sounded way more expensive than camping.

 

3. PETROL COSTS

With renting or buying a campervan, another extra expense is your petrol.

Your overall costs for petrol depends on the current petrol price, how far you'll drive, how fast you are going, and so on.

We ended up buying a campervan and can say, from January to May 2015, we went about 420 km on each tank of petrol in our 1993 Toyota Estima minivan.

To give yourself the basics on petrol pricing, you can find the current petrol and diesel prices on either of these sites:

 

All right! Let’s get back to deciding between busing, renting, or buying.

 

FREEDOM

Looking back at our cost per day estimates, we saw busing, renting a sedan, and buying a campervan were all about the same at NZ$4,000 we had to use another determinant to make our decision.

How to Travel New Zealand? Bus, Rent or Buy a Campervan

So, next we thought about our lifestyle with each option. We realized our freedom would be limited by a bus’ drop-offs and schedules. For the same price, we could have our own vehicle and have freedom to be wherever we wanted, whenever we wanted. If we liked a spot, we could stay longer. If we didn’t, we could move on.

Then, we imagined our experience on a bus. We would be dropped off at a bus stop and have to walk everywhere or hitch a ride if we wanted to go further into town or out of town to a trailhead.  Some of New Zealand’s best spots are off the beaten track, down mountainous dirt roads. We would never get back there with a bus ticket.

So, we decided to drop the idea of busing. We could have freedom to roam whenever and wherever we wanted with our own vehicle for a similar cost.

 

Yes! We finally cut our options down from three to two.

Now- onto deciding between renting versus buying a campervan!

 

RENTING VS. BUYING  A CAMPERVAN

SEE BUYING IS AN INVESTMENT

Like I shared, we had our tent with us, so we looked at renting a sedan (the cheapest style of rental car we could find) and pitching a tent each night. Renting a sedan would have cost about NZ$45/day.

For three months of renting a sedan, we were looking at a rental cost of NZ$4,050.

However, we were seeing campervans with a built in bed for sale online on Trade Me (New Zealand's eBay or Craigslist) for the same price! At this point in our travels, we had already been tent camping for five months around the United States.  At the same cost, a campervan with a mattress sounded a lot more appealing than a sedan and a tent.

On top of thinking about our comfort while sleeping, we looked at the long-term finances.

We finally decided to buy a campervan because we saw buying as a long-term investment. If we bought a van, we could hopefully make money back reselling it instead of just losing NZ$4,050 to a rental car company.

Our friends Sam and Jo inspired us with their buying experience. They bought a campervan for NZ$2,000 and resold it for NZ$4,000 just by making some small upgrades to the interior. Their success made us want to try!

 

TIME VS. MONEY

When we were deciding between renting and buying we also discussed the value of our time.

We knew buying and selling a van would take time and could be stressful. Since our timing was pretty flexible (we could be in NZ for up to a full year), we decided we were willing to sacrifice our time and take on the stress of buying and selling a vehicle to hopefully make money back when were going to sell the van.

It took us a week to find a vehicle and, at the end of our trip, we gave ourselves a week to sell the van. That time equaled to two weeks dedicated to buying and selling.

You may feel differently about your time.

BUY BACK OPTION

One time saving solution is getting a buy back deal from a car fair, dealership, or local Kiwi who sells campervans.

A buy back deal is when the person or company you buy from guarantees they’ll buy the vehicle back from you at the end of your travels for a discounted price. We saw car fairs, dealerships, and some local Kiwis selling campers and offering to buy the vehicle back for 40-60% of what they sold it for.

With the buy back deal, you cut out the stress of “what if I can’t resell?” You also save time by not having to find buyers and show the campervan. And, you are guaranteed a certain amount of money back.

We decided to buy cheap from backpackers to resell for more, like our friends Sam and Jo did.

You need to weigh your priorities. Do you want to spend more money to rent a vehicle so you have more time exploring? Or, are the potential savings worth it to spend the time buying and selling?

Think about the maintenance of a vehicle. Do you want to take on that responsibility yourself? Or, do you want the convenience of calling a rental company to take care of a problem for you?

 

OUR EXPERIENCE BUYING A CAMPERVAN

Like we shared, we decided to buy a campervan. 

But, we were still nervous. We wanted to talk with someone about their experience to give us comfort. 

 For a glimpse into our experience, here are the numbers of our purchase price during the beginning of summer, our extra costs involved with buying a camper, and what we sold our camper for during the low season in winter.  

How to Travel New Zealand? Should You Bus, Rent or Buy a Campervan to Travel New Zealand?

As you can see, the overall cost of our van over five months came to NZ$1,800. This was roughly NZ$12 per day. Not bad!

This number does not include our nightly campsite fees or petrol costs. 

Now that we've walked you through how we decided, we hope you feel confident in your decision. 

If you want to see more details about our campervan buying and selling experience, we've shared it here. 

We also wrote a guide on how to buy a campervan--- we learned too many lessons from making all the mistakes, we had to share the best way to do it with other travelers. You can see it below. 


Ready to buy a campervan, but not sure how?

We've got you covered!

Get our step-by-step guide to save you money, time, and stress figuring it out yourself. Let's get you on the road exploring right away. 

We guide on where to buy, how to get one on a budget, what to look for when test driving, tips to negotiate the price down, what government forms to complete, how to find free and cheap campsites, and heaps more. 

Your book was soooo stinkin helpful!
— Brooke M.

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New Zealand Campervan Catastrophes

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New Zealand Campervan Catastrophes

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Our five month camper van road trip in New Zealand has been a journey we will never forget. With a bed in the back, we have vowed we will be tent camping no more unless we are in the backcountry. Hey, we camped in a tent for four months on our US road trip. We did our time.

Last day with our good ol' camper van, Bernie. You treated us well for all five months and killed those 16,000 km. We'll miss ya, boy!

Last day with our good ol' camper van, Bernie. You treated us well for all five months and killed those 16,000 km. We'll miss ya, boy!

We woke up to new, stunning New Zealand views every morning. We are sold! Forget a house, we are dreaming of living in a campervan! We were outside all the time. We fell asleep next to bubbling brooks and woke up to views we would never have in a house or hotel. We had most of our meals outside soaking in beautiful vistas of coastlines and mountain ranges for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We have even stumbled upon the southern lights and an eclipse just because we have been more in tune with nature. It’s been incredible!

Waking up to mountain tops covered in snow! Ah!

Waking up to mountain tops covered in snow! Ah!

We have had our fair share of catastrophes and fails, though. How 'bout that time...

We had our nightmare on the Forgotten HighwaY

We should have known we were setting out for bad news. The name is the Forgotten World Highway for a reason. There’s nothing on it. Well, to be honest, we knew there were four campsites along the route, so we thought we would be okay.

We passed the first two in the daylight and thought we could make it to the next one. One thing we have learned about New Zealand is the distance on maps is incredibly deceptive. In reality, it takes three times longer than you estimate due to the winding and curving roads. Well, this was just the case this time, too. We underestimated our timing.

By now it was dark and we finally got to the next campsite option. Our headlights hit the locked gate. No access. Okay, moving on. We made it to the next site. This is it! We are home for the night. No, no campsite here. It was midnight at this point, we had been driving for hours and Adam finally just pulled over at a rest stop in the pitch black. I looked over and our van was situated on a decline with a cliff only feet away.

As we got into bed, I asked, “Is the parking break on?” My mind was racing of the what if’s. Ladies, you get this. Adam, knowing me too well said, “Lindsey, if we roll, we’ll roll into the tree." Oh, great, we'll just roll into the tree on the edge of the cliff. Hell no! I scrambled out of bed, jumped into the drivers seat and steamed down the never ending Forgotten Highway. Adam stayed in the back snuggled up all cosy in bed.

Driving further and further there was nothing. We were in rural New Zealand and good luck to anyone trying to read road signs in the dark. I kept politely asking for Adam to help me find the next campsite. Silence. “Oh, you’re going to play that game?” I have never been so livid. He always expects me to navigate for him and the time I’m powering through to get us to a safe spot to sleep, he’s not helping me! I’m talking to him, he’s not responding.

I know he’s awake. I turn on the music just to ensure he can't sleep. Again, I ask him to help me. I’m missing turn offs and signs for new camp sites because I can’t see the gosh darn signs. He’s still not talking. I crank up the music, loud, blasting it as loud as the knob will go. It's so loud, I can’t even think straight. I’m fuming at him! I keep missing turns and I don’t know where to go. I keep pulling over to look at maps, but keep missing signs. Oh, sweet Adam is still in the back, cuddled up, cozy and silent. Can you believe him?!?

At this point I’m crying from frustration and exhaustion. I don’t know where to go and when I need Adam’s help, he’s not showing up to help me. Desperate, I just pull into a motel parking lot and fall into the bed in the back of Bernie. If we had a house, I would have kicked Adam out that night. The couch wouldn’t have even been an option.

And the night we were attacked and kicked out of our campsite by the vicious flock of keA

Don't be fooled. Kea fly in gangs, consume rubber, can run as fast as your small terrier, and have beaks sharpened for war. Quite intimidated and outnumbered, we were run out of our campsite!

Don't be fooled. Kea fly in gangs, consume rubber, can run as fast as your small terrier, and have beaks sharpened for war. Quite intimidated and outnumbered, we were run out of our campsite!

Remember that time we were invaded by thousands of ENORMOUS beetles

How peaceful and calm this looks. Our experience was the complete opposite: Hysterics followed by chaos!

How peaceful and calm this looks. Our experience was the complete opposite: Hysterics followed by chaos!

So, we pulled into a green, grassy campsite in a beautiful gorge with a river flowing through and a historic bridge as a backdrop. I started pulling out our camping chairs and tv table to get ready to make dinner. I unfolded our little pink camping chair and immediately went peddling backwards screaming! The chair was covered with tens, hundreds, thousands of black beetles all 2 inches long! (Okay, I know I’m exaggerating, but there were tons! They were HUGE!)

I screamed and started freaking out at Adam. My fright turned to rage and even got stubborn Adam to clean off every one of them as he laughed hysterically. He started flicking them off the chair right next to the van. “What are you thinking?!? Not next to the van!!!” I made him go as far away as possible to execute those buggers. I had the whole campsite gaping at my hysterics.

Dinner was delayed as I pulled everything out of the van and scoured every nook and cranny of every item in every box until I was satisfied that every single beetle had been exterminated. Adam had left the pink chair out all night at a beach the night before and these nocturnal beetles found comfort in the seat of the folded pink chair in the morning. Unknown to us, we shoved the chair and the hundreds of beetles into the van and transported them all day! Disgusting! Thankfully, they were subdued during their transport, so many didn’t escape the chair’s boundaries. Thank God I found them before they became active that night as we slept right above them! Ah! I cringe at the thought.

My meticulous cleanse wasn’t thorough enough, though. We found remnants of other beetles throughout the van in the days to come. You bet no item has been left outside or will ever be left outside ever again!

Oh, and how many nights did we compete to see who could kill more sandflies and mosquitos?

And the time we found a wee bird in our push bike wheel. We felt horrible. 

And the time we found a wee bird in our push bike wheel. We felt horrible. 

Can't forget the Flood of 2015

All right, so Adam, our beloved, intellectual, college edumucated CPA, has a history of making terribly illogical decisions when storing large amounts of liquid. On our US roadtrip, he insisted on storing a gallon of Gain washing detergent in a Ziploc bag stored in the exact spot that we were shoving our gear in and out every morning and every night. Ziploc, I believe in you, but not that much. Turns out, I was right. The bag exploded.

Round two: New Zealand. With Bernie, we inherited an unused thick plastic camping bag that boasted it could hold 5 gallons of water. I doubted that from the moment we layed eyes on it. We already lived through this. So, we argued. Adam didn’t budge, so I gave up. The bag made it the first two months. Surprisingly, the plastic bag got a hole in it! What? Can you believe it? Poor Bernie’s carpet and everything stored under the bed were soaked for weeks.

Every chance we got we hauled everything out of the van and had it air dry. Wonderful Nancy and David on the sheep farm even tried a heater and fan on it for days. We won’t make that decision again. I’m putting my foot down.

Oh no. We are following a truck load of 45 porte-johns up a mountain pass. If anything goes wrong, things could get really sh!$&y!

Oh no. We are following a truck load of 45 porte-johns up a mountain pass. If anything goes wrong, things could get really sh!$&y!

These are the true, imperfect tales of #nuventures. I hear they say, "Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger." I'll hang onto that.

These accounts are unbiased, with no name calling or blame, and are objective in all aspects.

"I'll go climb the tree. This will be the perfect picture! Ugh, ugh... hold on a sec. Wait, ugh. I'm getting there."

"I'll go climb the tree. This will be the perfect picture! Ugh, ugh... hold on a sec. Wait, ugh. I'm getting there."

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Learn New Zealand Vocabulary

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Learn New Zealand Vocabulary

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Heading to New Zealand, hey? Good on ya! You speak English, hey? Sweet as! Just to be sure you and your mates will have heaps of fun and your mum won’t be worried, rattle your dags and get keen on learning your Kiwi English! When you do, you’ll be good as gold! If not, don’t get your knickers in a wad, she’ll be right.

We have a brand spankin’ new English vocabulary after five months of road tripping New Zealand in our not-so-flash campervan, Bernie, and tramping through the fern filled bush. The drives around the country were filled with hours of admiring thousands of shorn ewes in green paddocks, being spontaneously welcomed into generous Kiwi homes and served heaps of tea, biscuits and mince pies. It's been a corker!

We hope our stories and pictures have inspired you to explore New Zealand for yourself or return to the inspiring views! We have loved it here in this magical country known as Middle Earth. Make sure to use the US vs New Zealand English dictionary below to prepare for your trip. Don’t forget your sunnies, jandals and togs for the beach and your jersey for the cool nights, hey!

Tongariro Crossing, North Island

Tongariro Crossing, North Island

American mustard: mustard

bach: vacation home

biscuit: cookie

bogan: redneck

bonnet: hood of a car

boot: trunk of a car

Mount Cook, South Island

Mount Cook, South Island

brekkie: breakfast

bush: forest

capsicum: bell pepper

car park: parking lot

cheeky: sassy

cheers: thank you

Moeraki Boulders, South Island

Moeraki Boulders, South Island

chemist: pharmacy

chilly bin: cooler

chippies/crisps: potato chips

chips: French fries

college: private high school

chook: chicken

Nugget Point

Nugget Point

corker: very good

corgets: zucchini

coriander: cilantro

cotton buds: Q-tips

dags: dingleberry

dear: expensive

Hokitika, South Island

Hokitika, South Island

entrée: appetizer

ewes: female sheep

fizzy: carbonated soda

flash: fancy/ high class

flat: apartment

fortnight: two weeks

Route burn Great Walk

Route burn Great Walk

“Gold as!”: “Awesome!”

“Good on ya!”: "Congratulations"

gutted: bad luck

heaps: a lot

hens: chicken

hey: used similar to the Canadian “eh”

Queenstown

Queenstown

holiday: vacation

jandals: flip flops

jersey: sweat shirt

keen: excited

knackered: exhausted

knickers: underwear

Manuka Mire, Invercargill, South Island

Manuka Mire, Invercargill, South Island

kumara: sweet potato

lolly: hard candy

loo/toilet: bathroom

mate: friend

maths: math/mathematics

mince: ground beef

Roy's Peak, South Island

Roy's Peak, South Island

mufti: when students don’t have to wear school uniforms

mum: mom

munted: broken beyond repair

nappies: diapers

naughty: mischievous

paddock: field

Cave Stream, South Island 

Cave Stream, South Island 

partner: girlfriend, boyfriend, spouse

petrol: gas

pie: meat filled pastry

plaster: band aid

pram: baby stroller

push bike: bicycle

Arthur's Pass, South Island

Arthur's Pass, South Island

“Rattle your dags!”: “Hurry up!”

rubbish: trash

“She’ll be right”: all will be okay

shout: pay for something for you

slip: rock slide

sunnies: sunglasses

Pancake Rocks, South Island

Pancake Rocks, South Island

“Sweet as!”: “Awesome!”

tea: dinner

tea towel: dish towel

togs: bathing suit

tomato sauce: ketchup

torch: flashlight

Sunset at Pancake Rocks, South Island 

Sunset at Pancake Rocks, South Island 

tramping: hiking over several days

tyre: tire

university: college

walking: hiking

wapiti: elk

wee: little bit

Fiordland National Park, South Island 

Fiordland National Park, South Island 

windscreen: windshield

yarn: chat and jokes with mates

zed: “z”

A huge shout out and thanks to the Foresters for sharing NZ with us and teaching us our Kiwi-isms!

A huge shout out and thanks to the Foresters for sharing NZ with us and teaching us our Kiwi-isms!

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Sheep Shearing in New Zealand: Ewe Need a Haircut?

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Sheep Shearing in New Zealand: Ewe Need a Haircut?

Surprisingly, our sheep farming days weren't entirely over yet!

We had missed an opportunity to shear sheep and be shed hands during our first go 'round in Invercargill, New Zealand when we were captured at the launderette. So, we jumped at the invitation to be shed hands during a shearing at Gay and Ron's farm, Manuka Mire. Once we received her text, away we flew to Invercargill to get our hands in that wool again! As we were making our way to the farm riding down the familiar country roads we both looked at each other. It hit us at the same time. An overwhelming sense of comfort had over taken us. Warm and fuzzy memories of wooly ewes, overalls, gum boots, green paddocks, home made jelly and mince pies all started flooding back. We were pumped to be heading to the farm again!

Fulfilling our role as shed hands was quite an adventure. Can't say we have helped give a sheep a hair cut before! We were all smiles all day (probably from Gay's wonderful hospitality of keeping us loaded on hot tea and delicious biscuits)!

The ewes ready to go in the wee morning hours.

The ewes ready to go in the wee morning hours.

Robbie and Matt prepping their shearing gear in the wool shed. 

Robbie and Matt prepping their shearing gear in the wool shed. 

Callie the sheep dog is ready to go, too!

Callie the sheep dog is ready to go, too!

7:20 am start right on time. Not a second late!

7:20 am start right on time. Not a second late!

Squished and ready for their hair cuts!

Squished and ready for their hair cuts!

These two aren't so excited and are eager to escape their naked fate. Adam and I both had our fair share of tackling some of the ewes to keep them inline. 

These two aren't so excited and are eager to escape their naked fate. Adam and I both had our fair share of tackling some of the ewes to keep them inline. 

Robbie working the belly wool. 

Robbie working the belly wool. 

We were the shed hands. Sweeping up the wool as it was sheared off the sheep. 

We were the shed hands. Sweeping up the wool as it was sheared off the sheep. 

Working hard, the guys sheared over 350 sheep and did each one in less than three minutes!

Working hard, the guys sheared over 350 sheep and did each one in less than three minutes!

This ewe loves it! Not:(

This ewe loves it! Not:(

Two minute break! These shearers are strict on time. Still loving this #nuventures!

Two minute break! These shearers are strict on time. Still loving this #nuventures!

These girls are the after-lunch crew. 

These girls are the after-lunch crew. 

Lovely wool ready for the press!

Lovely wool ready for the press!

Ron, the farmer, shoving the wool into the press. Got 5 bails of wool from the shearing!

Ron, the farmer, shoving the wool into the press. Got 5 bails of wool from the shearing!

When the day was done, I requested they shear Adam, but I guess they thought I was joking. I wasn't...

When the day was done, I requested they shear Adam, but I guess they thought I was joking. I wasn't...

Now the girls are naked. Ladies, modesty, please!

Now the girls are naked. Ladies, modesty, please!

Rounding 'em up to go into a new paddock. 

Rounding 'em up to go into a new paddock. 

Our new wheels for the day!

Our new wheels for the day!

So pumped to be back on the farm!

So pumped to be back on the farm!

Gay leading us through her farm she calls Manuka Mire. 

Gay leading us through her farm she calls Manuka Mire. 

Pit stop rounding up some strays. 

Pit stop rounding up some strays. 

Gay showing us the lookout they built to see all the ducks in their lake. 

Gay showing us the lookout they built to see all the ducks in their lake. 

Of course can't leave out these girls. The curious cows on Manuka Mire. 

Of course can't leave out these girls. The curious cows on Manuka Mire. 

Loved being a part of Manuka Mire's shearing! Who knows, maybe more sheep to come in our future:) Now on to some Fiordland nuventures!

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